NIH call for proposals: Collaborative Projects to Accelerate Research in Organ Fibrosis

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NIH call for proposals: Collaborative Projects to Accelerate Research in Organ Fibrosis

Contributor: Sherry Ward, AltTox

Collaborative Projects to Accelerate Research in Organ Fibrosis (R01) (RFA-HL-16-003): http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-HL-16-003.html

Due Dates: October 22, 2015 and October 21, 2016

Purpose: While fibrogenesis is an essential process in normal wound healing, aberrant and relentless fibrogenesis in vital organs such as heart, lung, kidney, and bone marrow can lead to debilitating symptoms and organ failure. Aberrant fibrogenesis at the cellular level shows remarkable similarities across different organ systems. Moreover, a disease such as systemic sclerosis or an injury such as ionizing radiation may cause fibrosis in more than one organ system. Thus, collaborations among researchers studying fibrosis in different organ systems may greatly accelerate research in this area. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites Research Project Grant (R01) applications from collaborating investigators to characterize and compare mechanisms of aberrant fibrogenesis and/or fibrosis resolution in different organ systems; develop novel therapeutic strategies aimed to lessen organ fibrosis; or develop novel technologies to study fibrosis.

Research Scope (abbreviated):

Collaborative, cross-cutting molecular, cellular, animal, and/or human studies to better understand, detect and resolve pathological organ fibrosis are all responsive to this FOA. This FOA is intended to support projects that propose to study more than one organ/system – including the heart, lung, bone marrow and vascular system – in depth.

The collaborative projects may focus on a signaling pathway (e.g., the role of miR31 in lung and kidney fibrosis), a theme (e.g., the role of aging in fibrogenesis in different organs), an exposure (e.g., ionizing radiation), a disease (e.g., systemic sclerosis), or a method (e.g., novel imaging methods) to study fibrosis.